Sweet Denim Bench

I picked up this little vintage bench a while back and it sat in the garage for a while before I got around to working on it. But once I started it went pretty quickly. I just can’t believe that I had forgotten to write it up. I had uploaded all the photos, just didn’t get the text written! How the heck did that happen?

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Originally, I hoped to restore the bench, but the top was just too damaged and stained. And it probably was a saving grace, as while taking it apart, I found that it had been stuffed with horse hair and old newspapers. And it smelled pretty bad. So, 4 inch thick green foam replaced the stinky newspapers and horse hair.

I first laid a sheet of wood across the top. All of it was painted with a beautiful deep metallic brown paint. I just love the way it sets off the carvings.

I was in the middle of harvesting denim from old blue jeans and opted to go that direction. I carefully dissembled a couple of pairs of jeans that were similar in color to use in covering the bench.

Using a pneumatic stapler, I then laid the denim over the bench, pulled taught and stapled.

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Once the denim was securely fastened, I needed something to cover the staples. During on of many thrifting adventures, I thought that using leather belts would be appropriate… get it? A belt on a pair of jeans! LOL

I couldn’t find any belts the same – either color or style. So I found about a half dozen leather belts that were very close in style, so I opted to spray paint them the same color as the base. The leather took the paint very well and was even malleable enough to get wrapped around the bench. I even kept the belt buckles! From there, it was simply a quick tacking over a base of glue.

DSCN4652DSCN4651DSCN4650DSCN4649DSCN4648DSCN4647DSCN4646DSCN4645DSCN4644To wrap things up nicely, a quick ‘before & after’ photo:

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And there it is. Another project completed. I am determined to get these projects done so that I have room in the garage for at least two cars this winter! And since fall arrived this week, winter is just around the corner!

julie

Denim! Is There Anything More American?

I started thinking about this as baseball, apple pie and denim. We Americans love our jeans!

I played around with the waistbands that I harvested from 50 or 60 pairs of jeans. I’ve already sewn the pairs together and it is going to be handful. I am thinking that this might work… lay them in pairs and then piece them together:DSCN3709

Due to the heaviness of the denim and the small neck opening on my sewing machine, I am going to have to simply add the pairs to the existing piece. Usually, you sew two together, then sew two of those together. Then sew the 4’s to other 4’s, etc., but like I said, that will create way too much bulk and weight. And way too quickly!

I’ve been trying to varying the lengths, but they are all over the place. The piece will also inevitably get longer than it is wide, so I am thinking that maybe four large pieces placed ninety degrees to each other.

Here’s a mockup to show you what I mean, only you have to use your imagination to include many more waistbands and the thing being a whole lot bigger!

Waistband Quilt ConceptI haven’t been able to decide what to do with the metal clasp/button. They wouldn’t be nice to lay on or step on and most of the time they aren’t lining up with the band below or above it. But I think it is kind of an essential part of a pair of jeans, so I am tempted to figure out a way to use them. I guess we’ll see.

Another thing that I’ve not decided if I will resew the belt loops back down or glue them – either way it will have to be a lot of hand work. I like the look of the belt loops, but this is going to be a heavy and it won’t be able to be top stitched – so not a “real” quilt. But it is going to be heavy and warm, I promise! So far, I’ve not lost a single needle yet to this work, as the waist bands are generally only two layers thick, unless you hit one of those &@#$! belt loops. :-\ And wow, with the zigzag stitching, it is using up a LOT of thread and bobbins! I have been trying to use a light blue matching thread on top, and white for the bobbin.

I have to say, though, there is something inherently beautiful in denim – especially as they come out of an old pair of jeans. I had a few pieces, like from the zipper enclosure or a side pocket or seam and just love the way that the fabric fades and wears.

photoThe varying degrees of exposure to sunlight and the dimpled, wrinkled way that seams create wonderful color variations are something to behold. After I go through the ton of denim that I have to be cut into strips for the rag rug, I know I will end up with many weird little shaped pieces. I might see about just using all those weird shapes to create another quilt, less bulk might actually mean being able to top stitch it. And can you imagine using the ubiquitous gold thread to do so?

I started this during my sabbatical, but have since returned to work (three wonderful months now!). I am driving down to meet Rebecca, the woman who will be top stitching all my quilts this weekend. She has invited me to check out Collis Country Quilting – her setup and more importantly, meet. I have so many quilt tops and their backs ready to be completed… I am sure that I won’t even remember doing some of them it has been so long. I want to write a post for Rebecca and her services, so that she can continue to be available for my top stitching (I know, I am selfish!). I am so excited!

So onto the weekend!

julie

Deconstructing A Pair of Jeans With the Least Amount of Waste

I recently found instructions on how to create a rag rug. Of course, I want to try to make one with denim. And not new denim, but the soft, broken-in denim, like your favorite pair of jeans. And the best place to find that is, in fact, an old pair of jeans. Or rather, in a lot of old jeans.

So I started collecting old pairs of jeans. Off to my favorite thrift stores and second hand shops. Actually, I wanted a nice variety in the colors, so I picked some that looked new and were dark blue, and I picked out some that had wear and fading and were almost white in some cases. Then there were pairs in the middle, a nice hue of blue, some with fraying and some with spots – like the thighs or knees or butts. I started looking for the larger sizes and the lower priced pairs.

Side note: Even thrift stores have sales! The stores that we visit seem to have a color rotating method. It keeps stock fresh and making room for new arrivals. Always check at the front for which color is discounted.

So, The Kid and I had hit a GoodWill store on a different side of town while we were out delivering a dresser. The colors of the day where white and yellow -50% off – so I headed to the men’s jeans section. I found ten pairs of jeans in sizes larger than 42″ waist sizes marked at $2.48… so I walked out of there with lots of denim material and only spent about $12! Couldn’t buy that much new material in a store and this was soft and had a variety of colors.

Then it was time to take apart the jeans. I searched the internet for instructions, but I either found ways to do it that were inefficient (taking the seams apart with a seam ripper – yeah, right) to those that wasted too much fabric. I had instructions for using other portions of the jeans, like the waistband and outside seams, so I didn’t want to waste anything.

So, I decided to write my own instructions as I took apart the pants. There are a couple of terms that I will use that might not be obvious to all readers:

a. I will refer to the thread as gold, although it may be a different color.

b. If you’re not comfortable handling a single edge razor, a seam ripper could be used, but it will dull very quickly. In fact, the razor blades that I use are really only stay sharp through two to three pairs of jeans. Once I find some resistance in pulling the razor blade, I switch for a new one.

c. I will refer to seams as “inner seam” and “outer seams”. Inner seams are folded in and have no outside stitching, while an outer seam has the bulk on the outside and will have decorative gold stitching:

Inner:Outer SeamsOkay, let’s take apart some jeans:

1. First up is removing the brand label. Not all jeans have these, although I have found that most do. I found a cute use for them, by re-attaching them all to a denim pillow. May or may not do this, I guess when I’m done with the rug, I’ll see if I have enough.

DSCN34752. I have found the fastest way to take apart almost everything related to the jeans. Slide the razor blade at a corner and carefully pull towards you. Continue all the way around.

3. Jeans are tough. And one of the things that make jeans so long lasting is the reinforcement at stress points. Like the back pockets and belt loops and bottom of the zipper. The key to making it easier to deconstruct a pair of jeans is in tackling these reinforcements. Cutting through the reinforced seam is the most straightforward and easiest way to loosen the remainder of the seam.

DSCN34744.  I start by cutting through all of the belt loop reinforcement – just the bottom, where it actually connects below the waist band. Then, one by one, pull the belt loop away from you and using the blade, cut just the gold threads.

5. Next, we’re going to remove the waist band. I actually have a project that will use the waistbands and the belt loops attached (at the top), so it is important for me to cleanly cut the seams.

6. I find a spot where the seam isn’t reinforced or that it has more than one row of stitches. And then it is just a matter of cutting all those seams. I find this to go pretty quickly, the two areas you will find that need more attention is at the the ends – where the button hole and button come together. Just keep pulling back on the seam to reveal the stitches.

7. Next we’re going to remove the zipper and all of its components. I know some would like to keep the zippers, but in my case, I know that I would never reuse them. I rarely use zippers, but when I have, they have been much longer than the ones that come from these jeans. This is the first waste product.

Using sharp scissors, cut as close as you can to the outer seam.

DSCN3515Continue all the way down around the curve to the seam.

DSCN35168. Then repeat on the other side of the zipper.

DSCN34909. Now continue cutting to the side of the ‘out’ seam. This will continue around to the waist in back (between the pockets).

10. Now you have essentially two separate legs. Now you want to split the seams to capture as much of the fabric as possible. Start by cutting along the outer seam all the way to the bottom hem. Cut through the hem.

DSCN349311. Now cut off the hem and set it aside. I actually have used all of my hems in a very special project. It is SO cool! Just because I keep and use something, doesn’t necessarily mean you will, so keep only what you want and can use.

12. Now, lay the pant leg out. Then fold it in half, right sides together based on the inner seam. Now, cut off the inner seam, keeping as close as you can to the seam.

13. As you cut the inner seam, you will fun into the pocket as it is incorporated into the seam. Translation? Many layers of fabric! So once you have reached this point, open the fabric and cut with as few layers as possible. You also may have to contend with rivets at the pocket site. These can be heck on scissors, so be careful!

14. On the front (with the pocket) cut the outer seam to remove the pocket. I have a project in mind for the mini-pocket (or change pocket) so, I cut away most of the pocket construction and the white portion. I try to leave some fabric around the smaller pocket, so I can accomplish this other project.

15. Now time to remove the back pockets. You could actually do this at any point in the project, but I like to have everything already done and then sit down on the couch with my box of razor blades and remove the pockets while I watch television.

2015-05-12 21.11.10Again, pull the sharp edge across the reinforcement at the both corners, once or twice. Once you’ve gotten past the reinforcement seam, the remainder of the pocket is pretty easy.

I’ll share with you my little secret. Some of this fabric is going to be used to upholster a wing back chair. And removing the pocket reveals a darker fabric underneath and adds more visual interest. Even if you are cutting the fabric for use in a quilt or some other project, the difference between the faded and not-so-faded fabric.

16. Steps 10 through 16 as necessary to complete the deconstruction. When you’ve done, this should be the total pieces from a single pair of jeans to be discarded. I save the outside seams but the not the inside seams.

DSCN3518And here is my bounty. This pile represents about 30 pairs of jeans, ranging from size 30 all the way up through 54″!

IMG_4209The fabric shown in the photo above, is to be cut into strips and then braided into the denim rag rug.

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 4.19.00 PMI actually have much more that I am deconstructing slightly different as I am using it for a upholstery project. I got the idea from the photo above. I just love the juxtification between the formality of the chair yet informal fabric of salvaged denim. The small hints of pockets and seams just adds to the overall delight.

My chair is a little different than the style above, the back has a tufts rather than a flat surface. And this is where the different shades of blue will bring such a uniqueness to it.

Here are some other images that influence me:

Okay, that’s it for today. If you have further questions, comments or suggestions, I’d love to hear them!

julie

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