Vintage Pyrex – Figuring Out How and Where to Sell (and a Quilt Update)

Sometimes I think I am this close to be classified a hoarder. 🙂 I am a collector of everything it seems, but really, I just love beautiful things.

For instance, my son and I love to, as we call it, go thrifting. And there is so much stuff that reminds me of my family, my mother’s kitchen, my grandmother’s kitchen as well as items that appeal to me. I just love finding treasure in someone else’s trash.

One example is the eclectic array of red and white dishware that I have. As you may (or may not) know, my kitchen is decorated in red and white. 99% of what is in there is red, white or red & white. So, I am always on the hunt for something that will work in my kitchen.

Well, this goes for many other things, and last but not least is my love of Pyrex. My grandmother had pieces and my mother had pieces – some of which are now in my kitchen and often used. So whenever we are out ‘thrifting’, we always make sure to check for Pyrex. And we’ve amassed a pretty good collection.

IMG_4318This afternoon, we collected it from the varying places in the house where we’ve kept it and then organized it by color/pattern in the kitchen. This picture (above) isn’t even all of it. I decided that since cash is a little tight these days, I wanted to try and sell most of this, with the exception of my previous inheritance and the pattern/color I collect.

This is my pattern, red and orange and white with a little bird, called Friendship. I want to take the wood panels out of the cupboard over the stove/microwave and replace with glass to display my Pyrex. I also have a couple of additional pieces that were my (maternal) grandmother that I use on an-almost-daily basis. Keeps me feeling close to my Grandma that meant so much to me growing up.

So, tomorrow, The Kid and I will go about photographing each piece and trying to identify the patterns and approximate date range for the pieces.

Today was a great day. I sat behind my sewing machine nearly the entire day sewing 52592761272__A89E08AA-9AB6-4CDB-80F0-5A5B774A9C93.JPGstrips of 2″ x 6″ together to create “French braid” pieces. For me, a day like this is pure joy. Its almost therapeutic. I really don’t have to think and I can watch old movies and I just feel great. And this is going to be an absolutely beautiful quilt. I love most of the quilts that I make, but only a handful are those that I seriously want to keep. This is one of those that I seriously want to keep.52592772594__D97DA56D-4DD6-42D1-83ED-CA5B040F9C3A.JPGI know that I wasn’t supposed to be starting anything new until I finished all of the existing projects under way. But I have put a large dent in that list and technically I had already started this project… I had two braids done and have been hanging over one of the doors of the cabinets in my sewing room for a long, long time.

Okay, its still early enough that I think I want to do a couple of more hours of sewing before I head to bed. Thanks for stopping by!

julie

 

The Big Finish… Part Uh, Four? Five? Oh, Whatever!

So, want to show off a few more quilts that I was able to finish this week. See, you don’t get anything for ten days and then you get bombarded! Sigh.

First up is a quilt I had done with something new. It was an iron-on fusible material laid out in a grid pattern. I believe it came in 1″, 1 1/2″ and 3″ grids. I purchased the 1 1/2″ grid as I thought any smaller and it would have become a bit bulky and the 3″ didn’t seem like enough challenge.

DSCN3115This required 2″ squares that sewed down into 1 1/2″. Its quite a nice cheat, you lay the pieces on the fusible and iron. Then you simply fold on each line, top to bottom and sew your seam. When all the horizontal lines are sewed, you simply press the vertical lines and sew them.

DSCN3114The only “trick” that I can share with this process is that you need to keep the seam straight and uniform or you get funky folds.DSCN3113When done, I added a border. The border didn’t seem as, oh, you know, substantial, so I simply ironed more of the same gridded stablizer. It is supposed to wash out in two to three washings, so I figure it will soften uniformly across the quilt.

DSCN3112The backing is a nice solid that when brought to the front for the binding, has a small contrast. This quilt is going to be one of those soft, broken-in lap quilt that will do nicely on the sofa.

`6 blockThis next quilt is for a friend of mine who along with his wife, welcomed a second baby into their life. I started it and completed it before sending it off to be machine quilted.DSCN3110This is what happens sometimes. When I sent them off to be quilted, I also sent about 12 or 15 more along with it. I let Gloria do them as she wanted, choosing the thread color and sewing motif or theme. Every once in a while on special quilts I’ll define this, but we sort of fell into our relationship because she wanted to try new stitch patterns and I just wanted my quilts done.

DSCN3109So, long story short, this quilt was for the new arrival of baby Maxine but now that it is done, I think the baby is about three years or so!DSCN3108The color isn’t really true for this quilt, these are very strong shades of violet or even purple. It looks more like shades of blue. But I still love the way it turned out. What I like to call 16 block inside and out!DSCN3107I can’t say that I love all my quilts. Some are downright ugly! But mostly I am pleased with the results and little things that I try and am pleased when it works out.DSCN3106Here is a standard nine patch, this time in pinks. I tend to do a lot of pink quilts for some reason, maybe because I never had a daughter of my own to be the recipient. I find that no matter the pattern or shade of pink, they all blend together beautifully.

DSCN3105So, that’s my son helping (and hiding) behind the quilts. There are a few more to be revealed in one more post.

Sometime tomorrow morning, The Kid and I are heading south, ultimately to visit The Alamo in San Antonio. We plan to just take our time and see the sights and do dumb stuff. I love that he is still willing to do things like this with his ol’ Mom.

But, that means there won’t be as many posts on this blog… maybe I will have to play a game and find fabrics that reflect the trip (where I can) along the way.

julie

Inspiration Comes in Many Forms and Unexpected Places

Inspiration has a way of sneaking up on you from different places and in different ways. Feeling like I have sort of worn out the ombr̩ style and that I wanted Рnee, needed, to do something different, I found inspiration. In a crayon box.

I was cleaning out the cupboards upstairs in the hall which has been a holding place for school supplies for the Kid for many years. I had sort of made it my mission to help all his teachers and their students by always buying more than I needed during the back-to-school sales and stashing some away so that the Kid would always have supplies, and also donating at least two or three students’ worth of supplies to his new homeroom teacher. Needless to say, as we near the end of his K-12 school days, I needed to get rid of some. And that is where I saw the Crayola boxes and found inspiration.

huggies-slip-ons

I had picked up a dresser that was the perfect piece… solid and wood, but with absolutely no personality. Well, here it is, a bit of personality now!:

DSCN1272

I am so pleased with how this turned out. The base color – something in between orange and yellow – was a real bear to work with. No coverage whatsoever and even in priming the cabinet first, it required no less than six coats of paint. The other colors, even the yellow, were dreams compared. The black stripes and outlines were done with my favorite Elmer’s paint pens. I struggled for a while on what to use for handles, I wish this had been a piece that had built-in drawer pulls, but in the end, I just used wood round knobs painted the same color as the drawer, hoping to make them blend-in. I think it worked! What do you think?

Here’s a quick before and after:

Crayola Before&After

Another project done this week is a gem that I found at a storage center. The owners were clearing out a few of the discarded or left behind items, including this lovely little beat up piece:

DSCN1229

But if you can see past the flaking, dull paint and the horrible hardware to see the beauty that lies within, you are off on the right foot. The lovely curves of this dresser tell the real story. And in sanding the chipped and flaking paint off the top of this lovely, I found the most beautiful wood. It took nearly eight sheets of sandpaper and some real dedication and time in removing it all, but it was worth the effort.

Dresser Top

This is three coats of a natural finish, followed by two coats of polyurethane. It just shines and should last another fifty or sixty years! I didn’t spend as much time with the body, but opted to apply three coats of the antique white (one of my favorites) and then add the six ceramic knobs painted a deep chocolate brown. The perfect crowning touch. And here is the result:

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And so that you don’t have to scroll back up to see the before photo, here is the before and after:

Ivory Before&After

These are the kind of results that I love and only hope to achieve with every piece that I work on. But alas, there are two more pink ombré pieces waiting, one to be delivered and the other to be sold. Additionally, work continues on the doll beds and their matching dressers, armoires and night stands, as well as clothing. I hope to have quite a nice inventory when I am ready to start selling. It is turning out to be a little more work than I thought, at least taking more time than I anticipated. But it is fun and has been rewarding as I put my creativity to work in a smaller scale.

Thanks for dropping by! And keep the crafting and inspiration flowing!

julie

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