Hot Salsa for My Salsa Loving Kid

The reveal of today’s project is a little different than most. Today, I cooked! Well, sort of. I made salsa!

I’ve been growing tomatoes in containers on my back deck. I did much better than last year and recently harvested more fruit than we could eat. So, I started thinking about cooking something with them and settled onto the idea of making salsa. So last night on the way back from the hardware store, I stopped at the grocery store and bought the necessary ingredients.

In addition to my tomatoes, I bought scallions, cilantro, jalapeno peppers and something I hadn’t tried before, Orange Habanero peppers. The sign under the produce seemed to indicate that they weren’t that hot, not in relation to several other peppers like Ghost peppers that were on the next row down. And I only bought four of them.

So, I started the morning by dicing the peppers. I removed most of the seeds and chopped them very finely. (Sorry about the blurry photo!)

IMG_3421

I browned them in a frying pan in a little bit of butter while I chopped scallions and the cilantro. I added them to the pepper mix and simmered while chopping and dicing tomatoes. Tons of tomatoes!

Somewhere in there, though, I managed to rub my lip and then my nose and set myself on fire! It was then that I investigated my peppers of choice and found out that these are some of the hottest peppers grown! I also found that the best treatment involves dairy products, so I first soaked my nose in a bowl of milk and then found a tub of Philadelphia cream cheese that I proceeded to smear all over my face! A minute or so later, it started working and the heat dissipated. It return immediately when I wiped it off, so I reapplied and decided to leave it for a while.

In the meantime, I finished chopping the tomatoes and added it all to the pepper/onion/cilantro mix and turned down the heat.

IMG_3422Isn’t that beautiful?

I added two quarts of water to the mixture and let it simmer the better part of the afternoon. I actually let it simmer just a little too much, most of the water was cooked away. I hadn’t intended to cook it that much. I may still be tempted to dilute the final product if it is still too hot.

IMG_3424I let it cool a bit and then scooped it into two jars that I had saved (you know me and saving!)… and fitted them with lids. They looked a little plain without labels, so with “The X-Files” playing, I whipped out a personal label, printed them and glued them onto the jars.

DSCN4119Here is the label itself. For those who don’t know, my son’s name is Streeter. Most of the time I refer to him as “The Kid” just to reduce the amount of exposure on the internet.Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 9.00.56 PMHe will be home tomorrow – been gone for a few days – and I will let him try this. All I know is that the burning of the peppers took hours to finally dissipate, so I am opting out of eating any of it. The Kid loves hot – the hotter the better – so as the label says, its for him!

As a side note, I’ve sold three of my recently finished projects and have someone coming for a fourth tomorrow. I love this time of year!

julie

Deconstructing A Pair of Jeans With the Least Amount of Waste

I recently found instructions on how to create a rag rug. Of course, I want to try to make one with denim. And not new denim, but the soft, broken-in denim, like your favorite pair of jeans. And the best place to find that is, in fact, an old pair of jeans. Or rather, in a lot of old jeans.

So I started collecting old pairs of jeans. Off to my favorite thrift stores and second hand shops. Actually, I wanted a nice variety in the colors, so I picked some that looked new and were dark blue, and I picked out some that had wear and fading and were almost white in some cases. Then there were pairs in the middle, a nice hue of blue, some with fraying and some with spots – like the thighs or knees or butts. I started looking for the larger sizes and the lower priced pairs.

Side note: Even thrift stores have sales! The stores that we visit seem to have a color rotating method. It keeps stock fresh and making room for new arrivals. Always check at the front for which color is discounted.

So, The Kid and I had hit a GoodWill store on a different side of town while we were out delivering a dresser. The colors of the day where white and yellow -50% off – so I headed to the men’s jeans section. I found ten pairs of jeans in sizes larger than 42″ waist sizes marked at $2.48… so I walked out of there with lots of denim material and only spent about $12! Couldn’t buy that much new material in a store and this was soft and had a variety of colors.

Then it was time to take apart the jeans. I searched the internet for instructions, but I either found ways to do it that were inefficient (taking the seams apart with a seam ripper – yeah, right) to those that wasted too much fabric. I had instructions for using other portions of the jeans, like the waistband and outside seams, so I didn’t want to waste anything.

So, I decided to write my own instructions as I took apart the pants. There are a couple of terms that I will use that might not be obvious to all readers:

a. I will refer to the thread as gold, although it may be a different color.

b. If you’re not comfortable handling a single edge razor, a seam ripper could be used, but it will dull very quickly. In fact, the razor blades that I use are really only stay sharp through two to three pairs of jeans. Once I find some resistance in pulling the razor blade, I switch for a new one.

c. I will refer to seams as “inner seam” and “outer seams”. Inner seams are folded in and have no outside stitching, while an outer seam has the bulk on the outside and will have decorative gold stitching:

Inner:Outer SeamsOkay, let’s take apart some jeans:

1. First up is removing the brand label. Not all jeans have these, although I have found that most do. I found a cute use for them, by re-attaching them all to a denim pillow. May or may not do this, I guess when I’m done with the rug, I’ll see if I have enough.

DSCN34752. I have found the fastest way to take apart almost everything related to the jeans. Slide the razor blade at a corner and carefully pull towards you. Continue all the way around.

3. Jeans are tough. And one of the things that make jeans so long lasting is the reinforcement at stress points. Like the back pockets and belt loops and bottom of the zipper. The key to making it easier to deconstruct a pair of jeans is in tackling these reinforcements. Cutting through the reinforced seam is the most straightforward and easiest way to loosen the remainder of the seam.

DSCN34744.  I start by cutting through all of the belt loop reinforcement – just the bottom, where it actually connects below the waist band. Then, one by one, pull the belt loop away from you and using the blade, cut just the gold threads.

5. Next, we’re going to remove the waist band. I actually have a project that will use the waistbands and the belt loops attached (at the top), so it is important for me to cleanly cut the seams.

6. I find a spot where the seam isn’t reinforced or that it has more than one row of stitches. And then it is just a matter of cutting all those seams. I find this to go pretty quickly, the two areas you will find that need more attention is at the the ends – where the button hole and button come together. Just keep pulling back on the seam to reveal the stitches.

7. Next we’re going to remove the zipper and all of its components. I know some would like to keep the zippers, but in my case, I know that I would never reuse them. I rarely use zippers, but when I have, they have been much longer than the ones that come from these jeans. This is the first waste product.

Using sharp scissors, cut as close as you can to the outer seam.

DSCN3515Continue all the way down around the curve to the seam.

DSCN35168. Then repeat on the other side of the zipper.

DSCN34909. Now continue cutting to the side of the ‘out’ seam. This will continue around to the waist in back (between the pockets).

10. Now you have essentially two separate legs. Now you want to split the seams to capture as much of the fabric as possible. Start by cutting along the outer seam all the way to the bottom hem. Cut through the hem.

DSCN349311. Now cut off the hem and set it aside. I actually have used all of my hems in a very special project. It is SO cool! Just because I keep and use something, doesn’t necessarily mean you will, so keep only what you want and can use.

12. Now, lay the pant leg out. Then fold it in half, right sides together based on the inner seam. Now, cut off the inner seam, keeping as close as you can to the seam.

13. As you cut the inner seam, you will fun into the pocket as it is incorporated into the seam. Translation? Many layers of fabric! So once you have reached this point, open the fabric and cut with as few layers as possible. You also may have to contend with rivets at the pocket site. These can be heck on scissors, so be careful!

14. On the front (with the pocket) cut the outer seam to remove the pocket. I have a project in mind for the mini-pocket (or change pocket) so, I cut away most of the pocket construction and the white portion. I try to leave some fabric around the smaller pocket, so I can accomplish this other project.

15. Now time to remove the back pockets. You could actually do this at any point in the project, but I like to have everything already done and then sit down on the couch with my box of razor blades and remove the pockets while I watch television.

2015-05-12 21.11.10Again, pull the sharp edge across the reinforcement at the both corners, once or twice. Once you’ve gotten past the reinforcement seam, the remainder of the pocket is pretty easy.

I’ll share with you my little secret. Some of this fabric is going to be used to upholster a wing back chair. And removing the pocket reveals a darker fabric underneath and adds more visual interest. Even if you are cutting the fabric for use in a quilt or some other project, the difference between the faded and not-so-faded fabric.

16. Steps 10 through 16 as necessary to complete the deconstruction. When you’ve done, this should be the total pieces from a single pair of jeans to be discarded. I save the outside seams but the not the inside seams.

DSCN3518And here is my bounty. This pile represents about 30 pairs of jeans, ranging from size 30 all the way up through 54″!

IMG_4209The fabric shown in the photo above, is to be cut into strips and then braided into the denim rag rug.

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 4.19.00 PMI actually have much more that I am deconstructing slightly different as I am using it for a upholstery project. I got the idea from the photo above. I just love the juxtification between the formality of the chair yet informal fabric of salvaged denim. The small hints of pockets and seams just adds to the overall delight.

My chair is a little different than the style above, the back has a tufts rather than a flat surface. And this is where the different shades of blue will bring such a uniqueness to it.

Here are some other images that influence me:

Okay, that’s it for today. If you have further questions, comments or suggestions, I’d love to hear them!

julie

Back To My Quilting Roots

I just seem to be all over the place these days. Work is consuming me as I have joined a new team and am learning all new technologies. I just haven’t been able to land on a single project at home, so many are this close to be completed, yet I can’t seem to wrap my brain around any one thing or get those last few details finished.

Then a box arrived in the mail. A long forgotten group of quilt tops that I had sent off many moons ago. I have this wonderful friend in Arkansas that has been quilting my tops for as long as I can remember, probably close to 15 years. I don’t even remember how we connected, but I remember that I trusted her completely to make decisions about patterns and styles and thread colors. She has experimented and I have always been over-the-moon happy with her work.

So, once I moved to Missouri and put together my wonderful sewing room, I put together quilt tops like there was no tomorrow. I suddenly found that I had more than 200 completed and it was going to be a fortune to have them quilted, even with my wonderful quilting friend. I let them accumulate for some time. I finally thought it was time, so I sorted through, found some of my favorites or ones that I promised to friends and sent them off.

I got the first few quickly but it came with a note. Gloria was having trouble with her machine and it would take some time to get someone out to her home to get it fixed. Did I want her to ship the quilts back? I told her to hang on to them and work on them when she could.

So, a week or so ago, a box appeared on my doorstep! Yay! Quilts that needed to be completed. I’ve not worked on these specific quilts for some time, in some cases years!

So, when I was struggling with completing a number of projects, I turned it all over for a chance to finish some long awaited quilts. Here are a couple…

Jeans Quilt

The first one is a just one more of a series of scrap denim quilts that I’ve been doing for a while. These are made from many different pairs of jeans, some mine and the Kid’s and from friends that thought of me when cleaning their closets. I take apart the jeans and harvest the largest squares and then down until what I can get are 2″ x 6″ pieces. That is what went into this quilt along with pockets in each corner. If you look closely, you will see a second quilt underneath the latest, the Kid has placed dibs on both. They are backed with a soft flannel, one green and the other blue. One more still to go will have red backing. They are incredibly warm and soft, from years of wear… there is no breaking in needed for these quilts.Small QuiltThis quilt is simply the left over blocks from a larger quilt. The hearts were the first real attempt that I did in doing applique, not exactly my cup of tea. But I wanted to really give it an honest shot to ensure that I wasn’t passing up something that was really going to excite me. And I realize that this isn’t going to be it. 😦

One more quilt arrived in the box that I haven’t had a chance to get finished… and I want to take my time with it. It is made with a multiple of red and white patterns and it is stunning! This will definitely be completed this weekend. I will share it with you then.

Every quilt gets a special finishing touch. I know that I should be more detailed and more informational and more creative, but for the most part, once I sew that last stitch on the binding, I want to be done. So 25 or so more stitches secures this little note in the corner on the back.

Name TagSo, a little time spent doing one of the things I love doing the most and I have given myself some time to figure out how to get organized and see a better path for the other projects that need to be completed. And I am looking forward to the next box of surprises.

Bits and Pieces, Odds and Ends

Have been taking it a little easier since we’ve completed and delivered the doll house. Working on some smaller items while I relax a little.

A couple of things that I wanted to do but never seemed to have the time to do, was to create a sign for the half bath that is down at the end of the hallway. There are two doors together, one for the laundry room and one for the bath. Inevitably, guests sent down the hall open the wrong door. I saw a sign like this on Pinterest, I think, and knew I wanted to do something similar.DSCN1523This was done with a plant hanger (Home Depot) and a precut and routed plaque (Joann’s) and then just searched online for a font that I liked. I did this all freehand, although I was looking at specific designs for reference. I then used plastic shower curtain rings that I split with a hack saw and just slipped through holes drilled in the face and then around hanger. Hand painted the two rings black. Then two screws and it was done.

I thought that having this particular door completed sort of made the other one seem kind of, I dunno, bare. So, I created another for the laundry room. I wasn’t paying much attention and I created the lettering just a little tilted, so I just mounted it on the door a little tilted as well. Unless you know that it isn’t level, I don’t think you’d notice.

Laundry Room SignI’ve always been one of those people who seem to never be able to sit still and just watch television no matter how interesting the show or movie. I have to have something to do with my hands. So I hand sew, or paint or decorate or create jewelry. My latest diversion is creating food and accessories for the 18″ dolls. Once they have a kitchen, they have to have something to put in it, right?

So, I’ve started with food cans:

DSCN1557These are made from 1 1/4″ diameter dowels and the labels were printed from images I found online. I sized them correctly once, created a template for future labels in Photoshop. I used a real can and figured scale, something about 1:3 and 1:4. Mark the interval, also 1 1/4″ and cut them on my band saw. I lined them up and spray painted the tops and bottoms silver like cans. Then simply cut the labels out and adhere (I used a glue stick) onto the “cans”. I cannot wait to get the pantry in my doll house’s kitchen filled. I am also working on cereal boxes, pasta and mashed potato boxes and if I can find the right sized jars, I will do peanut butter, jelly and salsa as well. It allows me to be able to sit and still create.

And speaking of creating, I purchased a set of ‘knives’ on eBay for my kitchen. And the Kid did a wonderful job creating a small knife block for it. Didn’t it turn out wonderfully?

DSCN1559I included the chap stick so you get a sense of scale. And yes, the knives do come out of the block.

If you’ve been reading my blog, you know that cross stitch and rug hooking. And this time I did it to the dolls’ scale. First is cross stitch:

DSCN1517Once I had it all finished, I added the fringe on the two shorter sides to give it a more authentic look. I used plastic canvas so that it will last longer, I think it may be a bit more durable. The other is a hooked rug that I made using brown and white alternative yarns. It is very soft and will look nice under the corner of a bed or sofa.

Rug1And with that, I will wrap up tonight’s blog. It looks to be a beautiful day tomorrow, or so I hope. I think the Kid and are hoping to plant strawberries in the garden out in back of the house. A nice wet area that gets lots of moisture and sun.

Thanks for stopping by and come back soon! Oh, and as always, keeping making beautiful things just for the sake of it!

julie

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