Its Amazing What Removing A Little ‘Can Do’ Can Do!

If you’ve read my blog before, you know that my son and I have developed a system for taking those long dressers apart and making them either into two smaller dressers, or simply create a single small dresser. Well it got me to thinking that there are other pieces that would benefit from a little modification. You know?

So, with this in mind, I picked this piece up.

2015-03-02 17.37.57We had already removed the doors at this point (and try as I may, I couldn’t find a “real” before photo). I suspect that as the flat panel televisions replace those monstrous behemoths, the need for those huge armoires to house them will drop and we’ll start to see more and more of them available. And some of those will be great candidates for makeovers.

DSCN3153I started by removing the trim on the sides. I had an idea about how to reuse it later, once we had the top cut down.

DSCN3152So, it was turned on its side and I carefully marked where it needed to be cut. The Kid did the cutting, using a circular saw and made quick work of it.

We flipped it on its other side and repeated the cutting.DSCN3151Now it was my turn. Lots of sanding was involved and a little patching. It wasn’t a tough job, but wasn’t quite as easy as I had hoped. I reapplied the trim on the side and then placed a new top. Actually, it was an old top, salvaged from another project, but it fit wonderfully. A little sanding and primed the entire piece and the drawer fronts and it was ready for painting.

DSCN3154We were missing one drawer glide, but thankfully, I had one that worked with just a minor modification.2015-03-23 21.28.25Two coats of paint in my signature pinks and then The Kid installed our traditional ceramic knobs. I just love the way those very white knobs just pop on all that color!

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Ready to be listed on CraigsList for sale and to go into some little girls room! Actually with the height and dimensions of the top, it would actually work perfectly as a changing table in a nursery.2015-03-23 21.28.41WooHoo! Another one done. We’ve got a few more in the works, still waiting for finishing touches.

julie

My How Time Flies When You’re Quilting!

Okay, for the last four days I have been working on a new quilt. Well, technically it is going to be more than one, but the intent was to create one.

While organizing and cleaning up my sewing room – ostensibly for the purposes of trying to finish any- and everything that I have started. I get like this occasionally where I will vow not to start something new until everything I have already started is done.

In this exercise, I found a large ziplock bag with 3″ squares sorted by color. LOTS of 3″ squares. So, I thought I’d make one of my favorite quilt patterns (used on one of the quilts on my bed) and zip through this pile of squares.photo

It starts with a nine-patch (5 colored/4 white) and then adds the triangles to each side. I am guessing that there is an “official” name to this, but I like to think this is my own doing. 🙂

So, with this large stack of 3″ squares, I started making 9 patch blocks. It’s amazing how long this can take, especially since this time around, I wanted to keep each block in the same color family. So, after sorting and sewing – about 12 hours worth – I ended up with this:

photo 8The next step would be to cut and sew the four triangles onto each side. I didn’t have these pre-cut, so it occurred to me that I would have to delve into uncut stock, and I was looking to reduce the amount of precut that I had. So, I had an idea… each of these blocks would be set with a block pattern called a “snowball”. Basically a square with each corner replaced with a triangle corner.

UnknownI have found the easiest way to produce this, is to place a block at each corner, mark it and sew it diagonally. I got The Kid to help with drawing the lines. I had way more blocks than originally anticipated. Isn’t that they way it goes?

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In order to not waste the part that is cut off is to sew a secondary line about 1/8″ away from the original line.

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Then cut between the lines (removing the pins, of course):photo 10

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To make all the cuts, again I roped The Kid into helping. I hope that he is gaining an appreciation of what goes into the quilts I make. He has laid claimed to at least a dozen so far. 🙂

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Once separated, you simply iron everything. Depending on how many squares you have, this may take a while. I think I watched a whole movie while doing all this ironing!

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The larger block will compliment the nine-patch and I will use the smaller blocks for a smaller quilt. Or maybe a border on another quilt.

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So, next up is to connect the nine patch to the snowball. I am going to deviate each line of blocks so that it staggers the placement of each block. I may actually have more than enough for a single quilt top, and perhaps might divide it into two. The colors I have most is blues and greens, and it might be enough to spin into two separate quilts of their own.

For as long as I have been quilting, I never seem to be able to accurately estimate the number of squares or blocks I need. I guess that is why I seem to end up with extras, enough to create “orphan quilts”. Some day when I don’t have anything to write about, I’ll do a post on those.

julie

 

 

Sanding Here, Priming There, Gluing Over There

I think that we’ve fallen into a groove. We are working on about five or six projects, and every day we do a little bit of work on each. You know how it gets, you have one project that has been strengthened and glued and now has to dry and set. So, you go to the next project and again, you get to the point where you have to stop and wait. We’ve gotten to the point that we have five or six ongoing projects and we quickly bring each one up to the same point every day.

The Kid Puts New Fronts on Drawers

Working On A Dresser

Right now, we’re working on getting everything to the priming stage. Planning has to be done to make sure that you’re not sanding on one project while you’re waiting for primer to dry on another. Sometimes it means that one project doesn’t get worked on because it is ready for a stage that will conflict with another. And for whatever reason, it seems to take more time this way. Seems, anyway.

So Many Projects In Process Makes for a Big Mess!

What A Mess!

On top of it, working on so many projects at once, the garage gets so crowded. We keep moving tables to give us access to one project, just to turn around and move it back to regain access to the first thing. And I keep tripping over the compressor cable and the extension cable threaded between the tables for the sander and the circular saw and the jig saw. I took a few minutes and swept up the tool counter of all the saw dust. Whew! Whenever I am overwhelmed, I always seem to revert to organizing or cleaning. 🙂

I did begin work on a special project. I don’t know exactly why I decided to do this, but it is something I can work on outside of the garage. Not only fun, but it is something that I think The Kid might like. He is way into MineCraft – this online gaming and building program, where everything is in 8bit graphics. He has been playing and programming ‘mods’ (don’t ask me, I don’t exactly know) for this game since its inception, I guess. Something like 5 or 6 years. Had briefly toyed with the idea of a Halloween costume, but he was too old for trick-or-treating before I thought of the idea.

This is what a pile of gun powder looks like in the game:
imagesSo, I am making him a “real” 2D version of gun powder. I think I am going to either mount it on a base and he can set it on his desk or we’ll hang it on the wall. This is it, so far:

DSCN2950And just wanted to show you, he has a tiny version of the gun powder on his key chain:

photoWell, that’s today’s update. I’m close to revealing quite a few makeovers and re-do’s. I hope you come back to see them.

julie

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